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History

“No one is born hating another person because of the colour of his skin, or his background, or his religion. People must learn to hate, and if they can learn to hate, they can be taught to love, for love comes more naturally to the human heart than its opposite.”

Nelson Mandela

History has always been held in high regard at Michael Faraday Primary School and we believe in the importance of learning about the past and how it has shaped our futures.

At our school we enable children to develop a deep understanding of the rich London History, gain a coherent knowledge and understanding of Britain’s past and of the world around them and explore their own heritage and that of other communities.

Why do we teach History?
  • To further the children’s knowledge by giving all students a broad and balanced view, with intention to improve every students’ understanding of the History of Britain’s past and that of the wider world. 
  • To inspire pupils’ curiosity to know more about the past.
  • To discover links and connections to the History the children learn and the wider community and locality.
  • To motivate and inspire. It teaches us that a single individual with great convictions or a committed group can change the world. It is from numerous acts of courage that human history is shaped. Each time a person stands up for an ideal, or acts to improve the life of others, or strikes out against injustice.
  • History has the largest reference of mistakes. As we learn from the successes of our ancestors, we can also learn from their mistakes to prevent us from making them again. 
  • To become increasingly critical and analytical thinkers.  History helps us to look beyond the headlines.  It trains our minds to ask perceptive questions, think critically, weigh evidence, sift arguments, develop perspective, judgement and express our own opinions.
What do we teach?

Our History curriculum draws from and makes full use of the immediate and wider locality; the school itself is named after a local, world renowned British chemist and physicist.

Click on the link below to see the curriculum overview for History.